A Celebration of Shakespeare

Last week, we looked at the life and works of Shakespeare, because today (the 23rd April, 2016) is the 400th anniversary of his death. Celebrations and commemorations are going on all around the world!

Here are the contributions to this grand occasion from the patients and staff of Walton Hospital in Chesterfield, Cavendish Hospital in Buxton and Newholme Hospital in Bakewell!

shakespearequestion

Shakespeare was a bit of a man of mystery

Romeo and Juliet

Royal seal of approval from King James
Ophelia in Hamlet
Macbeth – a Scottish King!
Eleanor of Aquitaine appears in King John
Othello – a jealous husband

Anne Hathaway, Shakespeare’s wife
Not the best of husbands (running off to London!)
Died exactly four hundred years ago.

Juliet, the star-crossed lover
Under the balcony
Lear! The foolish king
In the reign of Queen
Elizabeth the First
To be or not to be.

Stratford Upon Avon

Shakespeare was born and died here
That is the question – some of his life a mystery
Romeo and Juliet
Actors on the stage
Twelfth Night
Friend of Ben Johnson
Or was he? Was he poisoned?
Richard the Third
Died shouting “my Kingdom for a horse”.

Under Juliet’s balcony
Polonius in Hamlet. There were no public toilets in those days – it must have been smelly!
Ophelia the daughter.
Novice in all his words, but never too late to learn

Anne Hathaway (his long suffering wife)
Venice – the Merchant of…
Open Air Theatre
Never forgotten, after four hundred years.

Mixed-up Proverbs

This week, we’ve been looking at proverbs, quotations and sayings. We had lots of fun looking at local Derbyshire sayings, such as “It’s gerrin black ovver Bill’s mothus” (translation: it looks rather cloudy towards the horizon and it’s likely to rain). No one has the foggiest idea who Bill and his mother are!

Stitch in time

We still use ancient proverbs and sayings.

We’ve written some poems that mix up some of our favourite proverbs and sayings:

Mixed Proverbs

As one wise prophet in Chesterfield once said:

There are plenty more that shouldn’t throw stones
A rolling stone wins the race
A picture is louder than words
Cleanliness is worth two in the bush
A picture makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise
When the going gets tough, the tough save nine.
Keep your friends close and gather no moss.
You can’t make an omelette without fish in the sea
What makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise don’t make a right
The early bird is a penny earned
An early bird shouldn’t throw stones
The squeaky wheel is worth two in the bush
People who live in glass houses get the worm
Don’t count your chicken – it never boils!

Every horse has a silver lining

People who live in glass houses are mightier than the sword
Fortune favours fish in the sea
Don’t be a borrower – be louder than words
Never look at a gift horse, but prepare for the worst
Don’t bite the silver lining!

Hope for the worst and prepare for a free lunch
The early bird gathers no moss
When the going gets tough, get them home
No man is louder than words
A picture is worth keeping your enemies closer
A watched pot gets the worm
A penny saved has a silver lining.

Ancient Wisdom and Modern Advice (we were also looking at a book of household hints!)

You can’t make an omelette without any eggs
– Always keep eggs refrigerated and stored in the carton
There’s plenty of fish in the sea
– Look for the fish with the shiniest eyes
Neither a borrower or a lender be
– Keep hold of household possessions and their value for insurance purposes
People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones
– Save egg cartons for planting seeds
Every cloud has a silver lining
– Hang them outside in the sun to dry
Never cast a clout before May is out
– Store your woolen hats, gloves and scarves away from moths

Poems for Mothering Sunday

Last week in Derbyshire Hospitals, the patients, staff and I talked about Mothering Sunday – how the tradition started because people went back to see their families and to visit the “mother” church of the parish on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Young people working away from home as servants would carry a simnel cake baked by the cook of the big house they worked in, and on their way home, they would pick a posy of spring flowers growing in the hedgerows. It was a chance for families to have the day off together and relax the strict rules of Lent by eating their delicious simnel cake (a fruit cake topped with marzipan balls, now more associated with Easter). In a simple way, these are still the ingredients of Mothering Sunday – love, food and flowers.

In 1908 in the USA, Anna Jarvis started a campaign to make Mothers’ Day an annual holiday – a day to honour mothers whose sons had died in war and all mothers. She conceived this as a simple family day, and her campaign bore fruit. Mothers’ Day became a national holiday in 1914, ironically at the start of World War Two, when many mothers were to lose their sons. The Americans always celebrate Mothers’ Day on the second Sunday in May. Anna Jarvis herself was dismayed by the commercialism of Mothers’ Day, which has spread to the UK too – I wonder how many millions we spend annually on flowers and cards – a far cry from those hand-picked posies of wild daffodils and primroses!

daffodil_spring_wedding_flowers

Bunches of flowers on Mothering Sunday

 

Here are some poems we’ve written about Mothering Sunday, giving a different perspective on what really matters on this special day.

Mothering Sunday Treats

Four generations enjoying a boat trip
Messing aroud on the canal in springtime
Mothering Sunday – a chance for families to get together.
Chop some sticks and do some chores
Flowers and chocolates – a card
Made in school and kept secret
A day off from cooking – a Sunday roast
Afternoon tea at the Cavendish
– Avoid the busy Sunday like the plague!
Too many people, too expensive.
Breakfast in bed, and a walk in the fresh air
Get rid of the kids and a nice lunch.
What about a spa day? Relaxing
In a heated outdoor swimming pool and hot tubs
at Eden Hall – a proper day off!
Or you could pamper the dog instead
At the garden centre, or buy a love-heart
On a Pandora charm bracelet.

There are many ways to celebrate and spoil your mother!

A Mother’s Day Bouquet

Daffodils so yellow and bright
Tulips are a vibrant sight
Carnations – a sweet smell from the past
Whose beauty, in the vase, will last.

Blue hyacinths that smell so sweet
On the windowsill, look a treat
Roses to show real true love
Primulas shine like the sun from above

Fucsia purple, fragrant dwelling
Flowers that everyone loves smelling
Make a posy, to give to our mum
To cheer her up when she feels glum.

These flowers we give – we want to say
How much we love you every day.
– Not just for Mothering Sunday!

A Yellow Shine Up on Your Face

A yellow shine up on your face
We’d shine a buttercup on your chin
Do you like bread? Do you like butter?
The flower would tell us.

We made flowers for Mothering Sunday
Selected buttons from a button box
Containing a lifetime of memories
From an engineer’s smock, coats and dresses
In an old biscuit tin.
Bun cases for petals
And golden paper to make
A Daffodils trumpet.

Mothering Sunday is coming this week.
The little children make posies
Of violets, nodding daffodils, even bluebells.
There could be snow, there could be sunshine.
But springtime is here,
Whatever it brings.
Sunshine is almost upon us…

Our truth about love

Last week at Newholme, Walton and Cavendish hospitals, we belatedly discussed Valentine’s Day. But it’s never too late to talk about love. Love can be a tricky subject for older patients, who may have suffered bereavement. But for some people, it’s a chance to revive cherished memories of a life-long partner.

Some patients have partners who lovingly visit them, and sending and receiving Valentine’s cards is really important in keeping the love alive, despite difficult times. These poems represent romantic stories and recollections of younger days. I hope you enjoy them.

older love

The beauty of loving someone for life.

Our Truth About Love

He was in the army. He had curly hair.
They sent him to Christmas Island,
And when I came home from work,
There would be piles of letters from far away.

A few weeks later, I came home, and there he was.
Sitting with my parents,
And he’d already asked my dad for my hand.
Dad told him to look after me.
And he did. For over fifty years…

Getting ready for a date,
Running towards him in high heels.
Best dress on and red lippy,
To Dronfield Picture Palace.

Love means kindness and gentleness,
When you’d do anything for someone.
Love and kindness lead the way.
Families are loving and giving.
Sending and text message every day,
Even though they’re far away.
A phone call – coming to see me.

Love means a lot.

 

I can’t tell you anything about love

I can’t tell you anything about love,
All different kinds of love,
Family and friends.
It’s the same as it always is, being at home.

Having your family around you,
Home means love.

I knew that she was the one,
And we’re still in love,
Still giving each other cards.

But I’d prefer a cake,
Or some chocolates…
I love you and I see you.
You’re lovely!

Some Enchanted Evening,
And romance lingers in the air.

 

A long time ago

It was donkey’s years ago.
Was it true love at first sight or on the rebound?

We were too close to send love letters.
Working together at Masson Mill.
You got used to the noise.
We didn’t make a big fuss on Valentine’s Day
– Rock ‘n’ Roll dancing in a suit and tie,
And I got married in my winklepickers.

A long time ago,
I went to dances in Edale.
I’ve always liked dancing.
Waltz and quickstep
Foxtrot and tango
Military two-step and barn dances.
I loved them all.