May Day and Springtime

On one of the coldest weeks in spring for a long time – in fact there was a blizzard as I drove home from my session at Newholme Hospital in Bakewell, we talked about spring blossom, warm weather, dancing around maypoles and the ancient festival of Beltane.

We wrote our own poems on the subject too. I hope you enjoy them!

cherry blossom

Cherry blossom – one of our favourite signs of spring!

Walking in the Woods

Walking in the woods
Looking at the changes at the start of the year.
First, the snowdrops grow,
Then the daffodils,
Followed by the wood anemones –
The pungent wild garlic, rich green with white flowers.
And then the bluebells.
So lovely and fresh – a true sight of spring.

In the summer,
I love walking on the beach,
When the sand comes up between your toes,
Feeling the sea water
Swirl around my ankles
Dreaming of Cornwall
The hotel on the headland in Newquay…
Until I step on a razor shell,
And I come back to reality.

 

Springtime in Buxton

It’s cold outside and trying to snow.
Scrape the frost off the car before you go.
But on the trees, the buds are growing.
In the fields, the farmers are sowing.

The lambs are playing, jumping high
Above our heads, the swallows fly.
The garden blackbird building his nest.
Busy rabbits in the garden never seem to rest.

We’re making the most of longer days
Look forward to summer holidays.
Around the maypole children dance
The May Queen gets many an admiring glance.

The cherry blossom falls like snow.
Sun on my face – I feel aglow.

 

Apple Blossom and Bluebells

Lambs frolicking in the dales
Jumping around, shaking their tales.
The purple heather blooms on the moors
The yellow primroses around our doors.

The bluebells form a carpet of blue
We wash our face in the morning dew.
And smell the fragrance of them too
Lovely cherry blossom – what a view!

Apple blossom white and pink
Over before we’ve got time to think
On the bough the blackbird sings,
And lots of birds spread their wings.

The cuckoos and swallows come back home
And new seedlings grow from loam.
Still time for cold and wintry blasts
We pray that summer comes and lasts!

A Celebration of Shakespeare

Last week, we looked at the life and works of Shakespeare, because today (the 23rd April, 2016) is the 400th anniversary of his death. Celebrations and commemorations are going on all around the world!

Here are the contributions to this grand occasion from the patients and staff of Walton Hospital in Chesterfield, Cavendish Hospital in Buxton and Newholme Hospital in Bakewell!

shakespearequestion

Shakespeare was a bit of a man of mystery

Romeo and Juliet

Royal seal of approval from King James
Ophelia in Hamlet
Macbeth – a Scottish King!
Eleanor of Aquitaine appears in King John
Othello – a jealous husband

Anne Hathaway, Shakespeare’s wife
Not the best of husbands (running off to London!)
Died exactly four hundred years ago.

Juliet, the star-crossed lover
Under the balcony
Lear! The foolish king
In the reign of Queen
Elizabeth the First
To be or not to be.

Stratford Upon Avon

Shakespeare was born and died here
That is the question – some of his life a mystery
Romeo and Juliet
Actors on the stage
Twelfth Night
Friend of Ben Johnson
Or was he? Was he poisoned?
Richard the Third
Died shouting “my Kingdom for a horse”.

Under Juliet’s balcony
Polonius in Hamlet. There were no public toilets in those days – it must have been smelly!
Ophelia the daughter.
Novice in all his words, but never too late to learn

Anne Hathaway (his long suffering wife)
Venice – the Merchant of…
Open Air Theatre
Never forgotten, after four hundred years.

A Trip to the Flicks

This week in Derbyshire hospitals, we’ve been taking a trip down memory lane to the old days of cinema. Before over-priced popcorn and huge multiplexes, every suburb, small town and even rural villages would have their own cinema. This treasured picture palace would be where dreams were create, where the imaginations of small children were set alight, where couples courted, and where people went to see what was going on in the world. In the days before TV, cinema newsreels were an essential service.

Saturday morning cinema clubs gave parents a much-needed rest, while the kids ran wild (sometimes!), throwing monkey nuts around and getting a fix of cartoons and Wild West excitement.

We wrote some acrostic poems about some of the things we talked about – I hope you like them!

Showing tonight! And Saturday morning.
(Bed)Nobs and Broomsticks
Over the rainbow
Watership Down

Winter Wonderland
Holly and the Ivy
I believe
Tomorrow, tomorrow, I’ll love you tomorrow
Every drop of rain that falls.

People queue to watch the film
Odeon cinema in Manchester
Pathe news with a crowing cockrel
Children watch cartoons
On Saturday mornings
Regal costing sixpence to get in
No noisy popcorn or smelly nachos, please, we’re British!

Trip to the flicks
Hitting me on the back of the head with ice cream
(a strange way for boys to flirt)
Excited, waiting in the queue

Roy Rogers and Trigger
Eyore – watching Winnie the Pooh
Giant gorrilla – King Kong
ABC Saturday morning club
Lone Ranger, loved by everybody!

Mixed-up Proverbs

This week, we’ve been looking at proverbs, quotations and sayings. We had lots of fun looking at local Derbyshire sayings, such as “It’s gerrin black ovver Bill’s mothus” (translation: it looks rather cloudy towards the horizon and it’s likely to rain). No one has the foggiest idea who Bill and his mother are!

Stitch in time

We still use ancient proverbs and sayings.

We’ve written some poems that mix up some of our favourite proverbs and sayings:

Mixed Proverbs

As one wise prophet in Chesterfield once said:

There are plenty more that shouldn’t throw stones
A rolling stone wins the race
A picture is louder than words
Cleanliness is worth two in the bush
A picture makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise
When the going gets tough, the tough save nine.
Keep your friends close and gather no moss.
You can’t make an omelette without fish in the sea
What makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise don’t make a right
The early bird is a penny earned
An early bird shouldn’t throw stones
The squeaky wheel is worth two in the bush
People who live in glass houses get the worm
Don’t count your chicken – it never boils!

Every horse has a silver lining

People who live in glass houses are mightier than the sword
Fortune favours fish in the sea
Don’t be a borrower – be louder than words
Never look at a gift horse, but prepare for the worst
Don’t bite the silver lining!

Hope for the worst and prepare for a free lunch
The early bird gathers no moss
When the going gets tough, get them home
No man is louder than words
A picture is worth keeping your enemies closer
A watched pot gets the worm
A penny saved has a silver lining.

Ancient Wisdom and Modern Advice (we were also looking at a book of household hints!)

You can’t make an omelette without any eggs
– Always keep eggs refrigerated and stored in the carton
There’s plenty of fish in the sea
– Look for the fish with the shiniest eyes
Neither a borrower or a lender be
– Keep hold of household possessions and their value for insurance purposes
People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones
– Save egg cartons for planting seeds
Every cloud has a silver lining
– Hang them outside in the sun to dry
Never cast a clout before May is out
– Store your woolen hats, gloves and scarves away from moths